Browsed by
Author: Marie-Amélie Boucher

The human hydrological model

The human hydrological model

by Marie-Amélie Boucher, a HEPEX 2015 Guest Columnist Very recently, my fellow HEPEX columnist Jan Danhelka discussed the importance of the human forecasters in the whole process of weather and streamflow forecasting. His blog reminded me of a visit I made last year which somewhat challenged my views on flood forecasting. It was a technical tour about water management on Spencer Creek watershed that took place at the end of a conference. And there I met the first (and so far…

Read More Read More

On the life and death of hydrologic models

On the life and death of hydrologic models

 by Marie-Amélie Boucher, a HEPEX 2015 Guest Columnist During the 1950-2000 period, a very large quantity of hydrologic models of all varieties were created due to a rapid increase of computational capacities (Roche et al. 2013). Now, on the one hand, although the creation of entirely new models seems to have slowed, it has not entirely stopped. On the other hand, some models developed during this 1950-2000 period are slowly dying because of the retirement of their original developers. Are…

Read More Read More

From operational hydrological forecast to reservoir management optimization

From operational hydrological forecast to reservoir management optimization

Contributed by Marie-Amélie Boucher The interaction between end-users and researchers has long been a central preoccupation of the HEPEX community (see, for instance, this post and this announcement). The recent workshop on operational hydrological forecasting and reservoir management optimisation that was held in Quebec City, from September 17-19, aimed at bringing hydrologists and operational researchers together to discuss their most recent findings and future orientations. Scientifically speaking, the link between operational research and hydrology is straightforward: hydrological forecasts are needed…

Read More Read More

On the economic value of hydrological ensemble forecasts

On the economic value of hydrological ensemble forecasts

Contributed by Marie-Amélie Boucher, Maria-Helena Ramos and Ioanna Zalachori It is often assumed that probabilistic forecasts should lead to better water and risk management through increased benefits (economic or not) to users in their decision-making processes. Most often, this assumption arises from studies based on evaluations of forecast quality, which propose comparisons of performance between deterministic and probabilistic (or, for example, ensemble) forecasts using metrics such as the CRPS and the MAE to support their conclusions. But, really, does quality…

Read More Read More