Category Archives: activities

Hydropower management in Brazil and water forecasts – Interview with Alberto Assis dos Reis

Alberto is an engineer and hydrologist at Cemig, a Brazilian power company headquartered in Belo Horizonte, the capital of the state of Minas Gerais, and is currently starting a PhD work at the Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG). His … Continue reading

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Hydrological Forecasting at EGU 2018: time to write your abstract

You can contribute to advance hydrological predictions and forecasting systems through the presentation of your recent scientific developments, applications and approaches in the operation of hydrologic forecasting systems at the EGU Assembly in 2018. Why should I go to EGU … Continue reading

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Ensemble prediction: past, present and future

Contributed by Fredrik Wetterhall and Roberto Buizza, ECMWF The work of producing meteorological ensemble forecasts started 25 years ago at ECMWF and NCEP, and it sparked a revolution in both weather forecasts and its many applications. To celebrate this occasion, … Continue reading

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Final call for abstracts: 2018 HEPEX workshop in Melbourne, Australia

As you may have heard, the 2018 HEPEX workshop in Melbourne is coming up soon (Feb 6-8, 2018). Abstracts are due for submission on Sep 30, 2017. The workshop will feature both oral and poster presentations. The theme for the … Continue reading

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End-To-End Probabilistic Impact Based Early Warning Systems for Community Resilience

Contributed by Dr. Bapon Fakhruddin, New Zealand Recently I attended the Fourth Pacific Meteorological Council (PMC) and Second Pacific Meteorological Ministers Meeting (PMMM), which was held in Honiara, Solomon Islands, from 14 to 17 August. Reaching communities and ensuring that … Continue reading

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Quiz: Can you guess the city by looking at its river from space?

Contributed by Calum Baugh, Maria-Helena Ramos and Florian Pappenberger Here are eight cities (and their rivers) seen from Google Earth. Can you recognize them? Since nobody seems to have guessed the quiz we had in a previous post, we provide … Continue reading

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Quiz: Can you guess the river from the space?

Contributed by Calum Baugh, Maria-Helena Ramos and Florian Pappenberger Here are four rivers seen from Google Earth. Can you recognize them? River 1: River 2: River 3: River 4:  

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Which scales matter for water resources management?

Contributed by Andreas Hartmann, Axel Bronstert, Bettina Schaefli The discussion about which scale is the most relevant for water resources management is an increasingly important debate of hydrological modelling principles over the last decade. The session “(Ir‑)relevant scales in hydrology: … Continue reading

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The role of Early Career Scientists in community research

Contributed by Florian Pappenberger and Maria-Helena Ramos (both considerably beyond the early career stages, they admit) (this post can also be seen in the Young Hydrologic Society Portal) Science and forecasting practice are the foundations of the HEPEX community. These are … Continue reading

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A platform: Community of Users on Secure, Safe and Resilient Societies

The “Community of Users on Secure, Safe and Resilient Societies” (CoU) is an efficient platform of exchanges among different actors of different branches of security and crisis management. The CoU initiative came as a response to the complexity of the … Continue reading

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