How writing an article can come out of the blue (KGE on log-transformed flows: a bad idea?)

How writing an article can come out of the blue (KGE on log-transformed flows: a bad idea?)

Contributed by Léonard Santos (Irstea, France). It is common to read articles in which the Kling and Gupta Efficiency (KGE, Gupta et al., 2009) or its modified version (KGE’, Kling et al., 2012) are used as a metric to evaluate the quality of streamflow simulations. They are often seen as a solution to substitute the Nash and Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE, Nash and Sutcliffe, 1970). However, are these two criterion totally comparable? Can the KGE be used exactly in the same…

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Hydrological Forecasting at EGU 2019: Time to write your abstract

Hydrological Forecasting at EGU 2019: Time to write your abstract

The sessions for the European Geosciences Union General Assembly (7-12 April 2019, Vienna) have been announced, and we’re excited to see that the Hydrological Forecasting sub-division will have 14 sessions covering a fantastic range of topics, including of course the HEPEX-sponsored Ensemble Hydrometeorological Forecasting session! You can contribute to the advancement of hydrological prediction by presenting your scientific developments, applications, operational approaches and more at EGU 2019 – abstract submission is now open until 10 January 2019, 13:00 CET. Why…

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CNDS Summer School on Natural Hazards & Disaster Risk Reduction

CNDS Summer School on Natural Hazards & Disaster Risk Reduction

Contributed by Siobhan Dolan, University of Reading. The Centre for Natural Hazards and Disaster Science (CNDS) held a summer school at their department at Uppsala University for early career researchers (ECR) who had an interest in learning more about ‘Natural Hazards in the Anthropocene’ and disaster risk reduction (DRR). This summer school was held on 20-24th August and had 36 ECRs attending, including myself. I am a doctoral researcher from the University of Reading and one of the 13 NERC…

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Can hydrological forecasting contribute to Science & Art projects?

Can hydrological forecasting contribute to Science & Art projects?

Contributed by Maria-Helena Ramos and Louise Arnal. In 1991, L. D. James starts his book chapter stating that “[i]n content, hydrology is a science; in practice it is an art”. The discussion that follows reflects on the links between science and practice at the time of writing, questioning how much “the art of hydrology [was becoming] increasingly outdated” and highlighting the “pressure for new methods” to keep on securing decision makers in water resources planning with “sound scientific information for…

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Fictitious Forcings have Macondo in Trouble: A Hackathon Story

Fictitious Forcings have Macondo in Trouble: A Hackathon Story

Contributed by Georgy Ayzel.  Meteorological ensemble forecasts form the core of every system for hydrological ensemble prediction. There are multiple data sources where our meteorological ensembles could come from: historical observations, numerical weather prediction and climate models, or stochastic weather generators. Different sources serve different ways we want to communicate and deliver the information of possible runoff responses to various meteorological conditions. However, there is a source that is typically ignored in the modern landscape of ensemble runoff prediction –…

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